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20121222
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-long event and actually constructed a building and this also helps us it restore capability to wherever we are responding to. this shows a lot of different response here. this is our urban search and rescue event that was part of the overall exercise. we had a lot of different partners that responded to this rubble pile. we had urban search and rescue, u.s. coast guard, and this provided an opportunity for our military to work with the federal and state partners there in learning how to interact with their agencies and also being able to learn some of the different capabilities that they have in using their equipment. we also had some medical partners there where they were able to locate and evacuate the medical patients and that also showed a great partnership. this is the health care association for hawaii and this is the part of the agency that helped us coordinate the medical response part of this. they were able to conduct a 50-bed disaster medical assistance team hospital on the island of oahu and this allowed the state of hawaii to be able to exercise their state-wide disaster dri
correctvth it building for decades. when i was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million people in the san francisco bay area from the hetch hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organizat
with us this morning. i am joined by joseph brian and the paster of the church works with the rainbow coalition. >> good afternoon. what a pleasure it is to be here and the patron saint of this great city work in the words of a prayer. lord, make me an instrument of your peace. as we look the things we realize the up tick of vlz is real and as we unified from all denominations and practices and speak simply. peace on earth and may this season be about peace. i commend mayor lee and work with him and resource ourselves and connect ourselves those in the city that believe our city can be a city of peace. as part of the rainbow coalition it's an honor to hold this today and jesse jackson and against violence prevention and that we can represent that well in the season of peace and we bring forward carolyn scott for our opening prayer of this peace hour. >> thank you reverend bryant. bow your heart with me. a discussion on the importance of interface based leadership on the city's violence prevention initiative predict and organize for a safer san francisco is where we're opening up
actually spend that the farmer's market. >> and go for it. >> incredible. you have shown us how to make super healthy, refresh chapino from the farmers market on the budget, that for the whole family. that is outstanding. >> thank you peter i am glad that you like it. i think anybody can do it. >> if you like the recipe for this dish, you can e-mail us at sfgtv@sfgov.org or reach out to us on facebook or twitter and we welcome, shall, to the uss macon islands. my name is lewis loeven and i'm the executive director of the san francisco fleet week association and what a great fleet week we're going to have for 2012. thank you. this is the second time we've had the uss macon islands and i want to thank captain pringle and his entire crew. what a great ship and what a great crew. they turned this swear hanger deck around all right night and turned it into a conference room and it looks absolutely beautiful. thank you, captain, and your entire crew. i'm going to make this short because we're already running a little bit behind schedule, but san francisco fleet week for the third year is
the time to take that training. it's tough to fit it in but it's important to fit it in and it will make us more effective. we did an exercise back in may in preparation for this and developed a pretty detailed concept of operations. we built load plan, timelines, spare parts lists, we really got into the weeds, thinking about the second and third tier effects, so i want my relief to understand that and i want him to know where that plan is so he can pull it right off the shelf if this ever happens and be ready to respond quickly instead of trying to figure this all out when we need to be getting underway. >> i'll boil mine down into just one, and that is i will pass to my relief to continue to support events like this and look for opportunities to continue to learn how we best in the military can integrate with our civilian and federal contemporaries to be prepared for an eventuality that we hope will never come, but we certainly should be prepared for. so the one thing i'm passing on is keep the momentum. >> thank you, all. one other benefit that was cited in the after action review and
know, it's great to say we should all use glass but we know what's used out there is plastic, and it's reusable, you can come up with all these ways to avoid it but there's plastic everywhere and it's accessible and cheap, so plastic wrap gets used a lot, there aren't that many alternatives that can do what plastic wrap does, i don't use a lot of it and it's harder to store things long-term and same question applies for the freezer, it's easier to put things in a freezer bag. >> so, a little tip for that is i do admit to using plastic bags, i reuse them and if something is not -- i don't use them for liquids and if something isn't somehow already kind of like a solid or whatever, parchment paper around that and then use the plastic just as the thing that keeps it from leak-proof or if i'm taking soup to work, i have my soup in a glass jar but i will throw it in plastic because i don't want it all over my backpack and there's also more stainless steel options which are a little more expensive but that's a one-time investment, just don't lose it, so a box of plastic bags, it lasts me l
with that with respect to tactical communications and we use coordinating helicopters to handle air to ground tactical situations and that is relayed to the aircraft that are in trail. it's not perfect but it's a work around and it keeps everybody in the fight. >> prior to 20011 2011 the navy fire fighting capability was concentrated in one squadron. in 2011 it began to expand to other helicopter squadrons. one consequence of that would be multiple squadrons providing aircraft to cal fire to support the fire fighting effort and one somewhat simple but very effective solution was the use of defense connect on line, the dco chat room. basically cal fire personnel, along with all the individual squadrons, all connected realtime able to communicate and coordinate both from the squadron and also on scene. >> well, thank you. let's go ahead and move into relationships. we had a significant discussion yesterday about relationships and again the highlighted and supervisor chiu's comments this morning. how do we ensure they are enduring past the past couple years. >> as general speese said yesterday, we
and to the citizens who are the fabric and texture and color of san francisco. so, all of us can stop looking at the death of george moscone and start to put him firmly in our hearts so we can see the likes of him in new community leaders, young artists, queer and colorful, innovators and students, all inside our magnificently and uniquely diverse and never-changing city. san francisco will never be what it was, nothing in life will be. but as i heard recently, we are always nostalgic for a time that never was and often wanting to avoid a future that is inevitable. will change in san francisco as in everywhere is inevitable. and change can be beautiful. we are all of us the agents of change. as george and harvey were. each one of us is the story teller of our lives and the lives of the people we've lost. and that wasn't always the case, as willie mentioned. but because of the likes of george and harvey and so many others, all the way to our mayor ed lee, all of us have voice. all of us can tell the story. so, let's crowd source this thing. let's tell the real stories of george and harvey. sto
and reverend brown and used his zeal and intelligence, his will to fight. he is a preacher, pastor, teacher, musician and a san francisco giant fanatic. [applause] and to all of you here today this issue of violence is a complex and challenging one. no one need to be self rightious about it because there is no instant answer to the things that all of us must. do i am impressed with the religious communities coming together. at least we should know that the issue today is peace is not the absence of noise. it's the presence of justice. when there is no justice there is no peace and when there is poverty and pain people search out for a bomb and put off that bomb. the excitement is that we're here today with each other. we at best can reach out to those who are not here because it's not just a matter can be solved with an enlightened church. the killing in kansas city, a football player, his wife and himself. three or 4 nfl players say they carry a gun and with basketball players the same. somewhere we're sitting around watching san francisco play miami excited who will win that game.
because we're eliminating cities and teams. are you ready? they were supposed to be better than us after a bunch of trades. the los angeles dodgers are -- all right. the giants. they're down to two games of cincinnati. they win three straight. the reds are? >> audience: out of here! >> it has to be louder for the next two. are you ready? the giants go to st. louis and need to win there and back home. the st. louis cardinals are? >> audience: out of here! >> now for the big one. the mighty american league detroit tigers. you ready? the detroit tigers -- they are? audience: out of here! >> you never disappoint. here is my partner mike. >> well, we have become an organization of expertation. there's expectation when you win a championship in 2010 and there is expectation when you get in that ballpark everyday and it's over flowing with your love and affection and there is purity in the formula that this organization goes about trying to meet those standards of excellence. it starts with the fans of historians that we call investors that kept us here in san francisco and goes to
, just immediately taking care of what's in front of us, to a strategic kind of plan that we can now look at and really do the best for the city. >> so the captain and the colonel, through the discussions that took place yesterday, what are some of the things you learned about relating to civilian issues that will exist and how will you be able to help? ?oo ?a northern california has rich and diverse medical response capabilities. it's impressive the types of capabilities, the number of assets, the number of people trained to do these things are. the california national guard has air and land assets that are substantial and can be rapidly deployed to assist the civil responders in their mission to move people, to get things set up, to establish common security. it's a partnership that really needs to happen and is natural. the governor controls the california national guard, he can make forces appear very rapidly in support of a regional disaster, a local emergency or wherever they are needed, and transportation, communication, security logistics capabilities that come to the table rea
at the capabilities and the resources that we would have available to us in the event of a large-scale emergency. my hat is off to all of you with just how well you've planned, your multitude capabilities, and as secretary schultz said i'll take a note from his confidence of display. to see how you set up in an hour a field hospital to take care of patients, not run of the mill patients, but critically wounded patients. we were so impressed. i think a couple other words the secretary used were impressive and reassuring. that's what it's about, forming partnerships. so, i'm very proud to be not only to be honoring and celebrating our military, but to be partnering once again in cross training. happy to report that a little later today aboard the uss macon, we're learning the best. firefighting below the deck, members on the flight deck learning about aircraft rescue, firefighting. similarly, and i won't be able to stay the whole day today because soon i'll be headed over to treasure island, a former navy firefighting school, we'll have that facility about 14 years and we'll be welcoming 40 members fr
engineering design. the trick is for us to sit out there and talk with all the different regional areas including san francisco and make sure we understand how we're going to work together in the event we have an event that takes our services out or is greater than what we're actually expecting and that's the challenge for all of us, all the service providers, is working together to figure out how to make that happen. >> mr. boland. >> this is where we fit into that link. we represent the utilities that protect and build the resill yepbs into the infrastructure. we fill a gap in attitude which is the relationships, distant and local relationships, cross boundaries between the multi disciplines in the utilities. we are able to cross those lines in the counties and step up to state operations so everybody is operating in a common operating picture so everybody understands what's available not only in their jurisdiction, but what kind of resources we can bring to bear, short and long-term, how distant those are, what the qualifications are. we have master resource catalogs designed just
vulnerable to radiation, so for them, alternatives to radiation based screening need to be, you know, used either in lieu of or in addition to and that's a very personal decision and a medical decision, but that added risk for those women who are already at higher risk from the very -- the detect is a really important issue, so does that answer your question? >> [inaudible]. >> awesome, okay, so schools, i've talked about some changes that can happen at schools but the reason we wanted to highlight this is because we can talk about federal laws, about state laws and it can feel daunting to think about getting involved in legislation at that level, although we try to make that easy for most to do by signing on to online actions and stuff, but for parents with kids, changing policies at schools can be an accessible thing, joining pta's or talking to the school board about having integrated pest management so kids aren't exposed to pesticides on playgrounds, that's been successful. there's a huge movement to get safer, healthier foods into schools and they just revised the school lunch guidel
friends who are dear to us will be kneer to us once more ♪through the years, we all will be together. >> hang a shining star on top of the highest bow. ♪ ♪have yourself a merry little christmas now. ♪ ♪ ♪have yourself a merry little christmas. let your hearts be light ♪ ♪from now on, our troubles will be out, out of sight ♪ ♪have yourself, a merry little christmas. make the yule tide gay. from now on our troubles will be miles, miles away. ♪here we are as in olden days, happy golden days of yore. happy friends who are dear to us gather near to us once more. ♪ >> through the years, we all will be together ♪if the fates allow. ♪until then we will have to muddle through somehow. and have yourself... a merry little christmas now. ♪ >> thank you. [ applause ] >> thank you. >> i am in the holiday spirit now, aren't you? let's hear it for tammy hall and veronica klaus. >> i got jealous for a minute there, some of the members of the san francisco boys chorus are getting more pictures than i am. as you look around this room, think about the events that you have bee
us in a helicopter, even though it was really foggy, they didn't see much, but they demonstrated proof of concept that they can connect the video feed. we learned there are limitations in things of band width and video feed that i'm not qualified to talk about, i'm strictly a push to talk guy. we know as a city when the earth moves, things fall, we get a lot of rubble. that's going to be one of our critical, critical things we have to do. we have to be able to move material and personnel and one of the ways we're going to be doing that is how do we actually get the debris off the road so we can put things back to work. so that was the command of control exercise. we had the marine corps, the navy, and the national guard all working with our department of public works figuring out how would they work together. we didn't give them a lot of coaching, we just kind of put them in a tent and said here is your scenario, here's some problems, and we wanted them to work it out and they did. so it was a very successful year. that's what we did as far as the field exercises. next year i
accident and visited the emergency room this morning instead of visiting us, so we have plenty of folks from the breast cancer fund and other groups on hand to answer questions, but we are missing our policy geru unfortunately, i don't know how much this audience is familiar with it but we've also been meeting and talking about doing a study of exposures among women firefighters in particular, and so we have some members of that team talking about that here, sharl patton is back there, give a wave, and did rachel step out already? and rachel thought she was going to give a wave but she had to step out to go to another meeting, from the breast cancer fund, we have my two science leaders, [inaudible] and janet gray, so science questions galor, they can handle them all, policy questions, we'll have to deflect some of those to nancy for another time, so what i'm going to present today is what we call our healthy home and healthy world tours, i'll talk a little bit about who the breast cancer fund is and then we're going to walk through kind of the rooms in your home talking about tips for a
for that requirement. so i'm not certain how that would apply if we're using those folks in a humanitarian disaster in california. we're able to treat our folks regardless of the state of licensing in a particular state, though. >> last year when i took a look at the shock trauma platoon, and i'm going to talk to you about that one really cool thing i saw. i have a little bit of medical experience and to see they have effectively a robotic soldier that can go into defib, whose eyes can dilate, they can do pulses both radial and distal and there is a programmer who is effectively testing a battlefield soldier what to do, i found absolutely fascinating as a way to bring a real life experience to that individual. for me that was a fantastic tool that you have and i thought that was wonderful. >> we're going to be -- little advertisement -- we're going to be demonstrating that capability at our display at the marina green so if you'd like to come see that, that's available. >> any final questions? i'd like to thank our panelists very much. as rob mentioned earlier, the exercise series we have put o
the same as they were in the late 1800's. we use a modern machinery. we haven't changed a thing. it's just how we get there. >> it's a time consuming job. we go for the quality rather than the production. we take pride in our work and it shows in the end product. >> the california line is mostly locals. the commuters in the morning, i see a lot of the same people. we don't have as tourists. we are coming up to street to chinatown. since 1957, we are the only city in the world that runs cable cars. these cars right here are part of national parks system. in the early 1960's, they became the first roles monument. the way city spread changed with the invention of the cable car. >> people know in san francisco, first thing they think about is, let's go across america, cities and towns, homes and businesses all depend upon one basic resource. modern civilization and life itself would be impossible without it. woman: okay, so today, we're going to look at how do we get our water? narrator: and today, it's a matter of simply turning on the tap. so often, we forget about the value of water. water
was close to 30 billion u.s. dollars. how we organize, well, we have something similar that you have. we have the national emergency office under the internal affair minister and they have offices in the different counties, in the different places in chile this emergency office request aid directly to the joint chief of staff and joint chief of staff to the army, navy or air force and then we move the pieces to put the aid where they need it. the scenario, the beginning when we face this was the same thing we are talking about in this seminar. the necessity was access because everything was, the delivery was absolutely hampered because of the roads so we have to clean it. water, food, electricity and communications. another need at that time to do that is field hospital generators, housing, sat coms, purifying water systems and mobile bridges. so the force was at the beginning just to distribute the aid and at the end start doing law enforcement when the government declared catastrophe and the president gave us the authority to do that. so we move the army inland, next the navy in the
and many of us know laverne and we would like to say a prayer that she gets better soon and can come and see us. this is for laverne. yes. please let's clap our hands for laverne. [applause] >> thank you. laverne roberts was honored here in this space two years ago. thank you laverne. and i think i can say a lot more about being indian and how much i am proud to be indian. i did work in the school district for more than 20 years, and the people that i work with they still call me up and tell me their troubles, and ask for help sometimes, but thank you very much for all of you to come tonight. [applause] >> all right. thank you gwen and anaciata as well. i saw your family over there and got a bunch of hugs. all right. is shirley here yet? is shirley cavara here yet? good to see you shirley. calling to the stage at this time amanda bloom. [applause] >> it's a great honor for me to introduce shirley. for any of you that know shirley. whatever shirley wants she gets so she said i had to introduce her and here i am. sheerly is amazing woman and was at alcatraz and taught c
and learned to use cooking for the core standards. we range all over the place. we really want everyone to feel like they can be included in the conversation. a lot of organizations i think which say we're going to teach cooking or we're going to teach gardening, or we're going to get in the policy side of the food from conversation. we say all of that is connected and we want to provide a place that feels really community oriented where you can be interested in multiple of those things or one of those things and have an entree point to meet people. we want to build community and we're using food as a means to that end. >> we have a wonderful organization to be involved with obviously coming from buy right where really everyone is treated very much like family. coming into 18 reasons which even more community focused is such a treat. we have these events in the evening and we really try and bring people together. people come in in groups, meet friends that they didn't even know they had before. our whole set up is focused on communal table. you can sit across from someone and start a co
community. remember those that are not with us, unable to be here, or traveling. we ask for blessing upon them, their families, their friends. we come before you. we are humbled two leggeds. we give things. honde,honde, the best it could possible me. to the singers, to the dancers, their families. honde, honde to everyone in attendance. ( spiritual chanting). (spiritual chanting). grandfather, creator, once again we come together, and gave praise and honor to you, and if you for the many blessings, and again honde, honde for this day. we say these things in your name. please remain standing as we welcome and present to you the grand entry of our eagle staff and our dancers. here we go. bring em in. carrying the first flag of this nation, of this land, the eagle staff larry harristan. how about a round of applause for larry? thank you larry. bringing in our dancers. (drums). good to see you. our southern and northern dancers. welcome ladies. welcome. followed by our jingle "dancing with dancers. welcoming our dancers as well. our northern traditional dancers followed by
the wishes, that this tree represents for all of us. and that will make this world, with our own decisions, with our own hands, more acceptance, more tolerance, as we wait with great anxiousness on our u.s. supreme court to exhibit their tolerance in our united states for the same-sex marriage that we all deserve. [ applause ] i also wanted to again, acknowledge that this is the season of giving, and hope that you will join us from now to the end of january, and a donation in the city hall when you have to visit, we have canisters for those who need food for this season, also if you would join us in the weekend of december 15th and 16th, we are going to have family orientation outside with snow day here in city hall. we are bringing snow in again. and we are going to enjoy this with our snow day, december 15th and 16th, you are all welcome to come and bring the kids and all of the extended families. and if i may say again, these holidays and what the tree represent is the best hope and wishes. the holidays should never be about ourselves. what reminds us and what this tree will continue do
you're used to. as long as people recognize they're moving to the desert and give up this notion that they have to bring eastern vegetation with them and make the necessary adaptations in their own life, desert communities can continue to live. man: the biggest water user in the desert is turf. turf uses a lot of irrigation and uses spray irrigation, so what we've done here is use artificial turf. you're never going to be able to achieve the look of back east or the look of, say, california, with subtropical plants, but our landscapes are still lush and use about 30% of what the subtropical landscape with turf would use. las vegas has adopted a drought tolerant ordinance. we're using less water today than we used five years ago, despite over 300,000 new residents. i think it's a pretty amazing example as to how a town can really turn on a dime if there's the political will and if the public gets behind it. narrator: even the casinos and resorts have adapted to efficient water use. mulroy: the las vegas strip uses only 3% of all the water that we deliver. and when you think about
believe that the u.s. navy is capable of maintaining that unambiguous military strength. as we sit here this morning aboard the uss macon island, in san francisco bay, looking out to the pacific, it is easy to believe that the united states is, in fact, a pacific power and that to keep it that way we will maintain the best damn navy in the world. thank you very much. (applause)speaker .... >> now i'm going to introduce our next speaker, major general melvin spee splt e i've known melvin for a number of years, obviously we served together in the marine corps. i can tell you he's been with fleet week for 3 years now and the one thing about mel, he's got a lot of ideas and he accepts no as an interim answer because a lot of things that he wanted to do to make fleet week better originally the answer from authorities was no. and he made some amazing things happen just through his will. a commander can will things to happen. and i really want to thank you, mel, for that whole peer to peer medical exchange was your idea and it was just a huge hit and i thank you so much for that. he's offe
love you provided us selling out all 89 home games and all the wonderful fanses, and i see some of you that traveled withed team, road warriors to make road games feel like home games. you inspired us. we know you filled this plaza on sunday when we were in detroit. we know you cheer friday your couches at home, from your neighborhood street parties and then throughout october with the city we lit up the city. it was a washid orange from coit tower to the ferry building to right here at city hall. what can we take away from our 2012 giants? i believe we can take away life lessons. vuch teachable moments for our children and our team did face challenges and whether facing injuries or newly acquired players or facing elimination game one after another. what were the life lessons? never give up no matter how high the mountain is to climb. have integrity and conduct yourself with professionalism. did this team do that? absolutely. play with a team with unselfish devotion. trust one another and love your team teammates and in always do so have fun and it's meant to be played a
community, it is so important for us to walk up that central staircase and for us to be in the middle of everything and for everyone to know that we are here. and all these years later, we've made a lot of strides in the lgbt community, but we still have so much work to do around hiv issues, around our youth, around discrimination, around transinclusion, and all the things that we know that harvey had he been here today would still be working on and leading on. and, so, we have to keep doing our work. and frankly, we can't take for granted that queer people are going to keep getting elected to office if we don't work on that and focus on that, we'll quickly slide back. so, we're here today to remember and also to look forward. so, it is my great honor to turn the mic over to our mistress of ceremonies, one of harvey's legislative aides and now the director of emergency management in san francisco and one of my absolute favorite people in city hall, the great ann kronenberg. [cheering and applauding] >> i have to move this mic down a little bit, supervisor. welcome. thank you all so mu
doesn't work too well, so they still had to use the facility but they housed the personnel in two tents out in front. their headquarters is one tent and their dorm is another tent and they welcomed us in there, didn't even think twice. and in the story of what it was like there, for a community of nearly 700,000 people, their complete complement of fire fighters that were on duty, their professional staff, was just over 40. they had 4 pieces of apparatus. the newest of which was over 10 years old. they kept it together literally with duct tape and baling wire and that's what they did every day. and i asked them, how was it after the earthquake. and he said, well, you know, most of them lost their homes too. nobody here was untouched. they all lost family in the rubble, they all lost their homes, but they all came to work. every one of them went out and worked every day until they got as many people recovered as possible and even then most of them just moved into the fire station because they didn't have anywhere else to go. and even then it didn't stop because now you hav
and 1 dollar from all of us. that can really help and donate at red cross .org and we thank you for your generosity. it was just two years ago that we captured the championship since moving to san francisco and i think we're happy we didn't have to wait until 52 years. [cheers and applause] we've got another trophy in this great city by the bay. [cheers and applause] so today giants fans once again you are all world champions and together we are giants, so we have a wonderful program planned for you today and i know you're anxious to get this started started and bring the guys out and celebrate your 2012 san francisco giants so let's get started. first of all we are joined by a number of special dignitaries who have helped to make san francisco one of the best baseball towns -- no, the best baseball town in america. [cheers and applause] let us now welcome and please show your love and enthusiasm the mayor of city and county of san francisco the honorable edwin lee. former mayor and current lieutenant governor the honorable gavin newsom. the city chief of protocol charlotte schultz,
there's a little girl or little by or grandmother that is counting on us to get it right. so i thank you in advance for that young boy, that young girl, that family, whose lives will be changed, whose lives may even be preserved, because of your efforts. thank you for inviting me here today, thank you for allowing me to learn from you, thank you for allowing me it share a little bit about what we do and mostly to simply say thank you, it was my pleasure to be here, secretary schultz, thank you, admiral beeman, thank you. ladies and gentlemen, that's all i have. if you have any questions i'll be happy to take them. response and recovery. and the moderator for this panel is the city administrator for the city and county of san francisco, naomi kelly. please help me welcome naomi kelly. (applause). >> good afternoon, everyone. thank you for having me here today. again, i'm naomi kelly, city administrator for the city and county of san francisco and it's an honor to be participating in this important panel discussion on the uss macon island. over the course of the next 50 minutes, we wi
city in the u.s. and over 40 million tourists visit the city every year. the 1.3 billion gallons of water required every day are delivered by a system of extraordinary scale and complex engineering. man: water is essential to the economic viability of new york city. reliable infrastructure and reliable delivery of water is a must. you have to reinvest in the infrastructure every single minute to keep it current. hurwitz: we have the stock exchange, we have the united nations -- failure can have a dramatic impact on the nation, and even internationally. so there's a really keen awareness that you always have to be fixing the system. things corrode, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny, that making any accommodation to shut it down, to do something to it, is very difficult. narrator: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th cent
's the weekly buzz. visit us >> my name is phil ginsburg and the general manager of the san francisco parks and rec department and i want to welcome everybody to the 83rd annual holiday tree lighting. happy holidays to you all. this is san francisco's official holiday tree right behind us, uncle john's tree and over 100 years old, and tonight it sports over 550 christmas holiday lights. >> five, four, three, two, one! >> yay! >> the public wants to access particular information about your house or neighborhood we point them to gis. gis is a combination of maps and data. not a graphic you see on a screen. you get the traffic for the streets the number of crimes for a police district in a period of time. if the idea of combining the different layerce of information and stacking them on top of each other to present to the public. >> other types of gis are web based mapping systems. like google earth, yahoo maps. microsoft. those are examples of on line mapping systems that can be used to find businesses or get driving directions or check on traffic conditions. all digital maps. >> gis is u
. that's the weekly buzz. visit us >> my name is phil ginsburg and the general manager of the san francisco parks and rec department and i want to welcome everybody to the 83rd annual holiday tree lighting. happy holidays to you all. this is san francisco's official holiday tree right behind us, uncle john's
because we live on a major fault so what does this mean for us? part of what it means is that potentially 25% of san francisco's building stock will be uninhibit tabl and people can't stay in their homes after an earthquake. they may have to go to shelters or leave entirely and we don't want that to happen. >> we want a building stock to encourage them to stay in the homes and encourage them to stay and not relocate to other locations and shelters. >> that's right so that means the housing needs to be safe enough to stay and we have been focused in trying to define what that means and you as a former building official knows better than anybody the code says if an earthquake happens it won't kill you but doesn't necessarily say that can you stay in your home and we set out to define what that might mean and you know because you built this house we're in now and this shows what it's like to be in a place safe enough to stay. it's not going to be perfect. there maybe cracks in the walls and not have gas or electricity within a while but can you essentially camp out within your unit. what'
have a fairly robust what we call fire crew program using cdcr inmate fire fighters. it is on our radar and it's something that we have as a contingency if we needed to do it. >> lieutenant colonel. >> yes, general, in the mou it does address the ground portion but the focus of effort is mainly on the aviation side but it is built in there for the ground side if necessary. >> i just want to say in 2008 we did activate hand crews to fight fires and we've identified soldiers throughout the state to respond if needed. they've got the tools that they need, the boots and all that cached and available. it's really just a matter of getting the call and being ready to go. >> i was going to end with general myat. i know we've trained soldiers to do that kind of thing. after the colorado fires just recently they did put a lot of soldiers that trained, so we do still have that program who can do that if the need warrants. any other questions from out there before i turn it over to general myat? let me thank our panel here. >> thank you. (applause). as we leave here today, we need to keep
's unique, vertically challenged terrain. we are still using cars a century old >> the old cable car is the most unique thing, it's still going. it was a good design by then and is still now. if we don't do something now. it's going to be worse later. >> the cable cars are built the same as they were in the late 1800's. we use a modern machinery. we haven't changed a thing. it's just how we get there. >> it's a time consuming job. we go for the quality rather than the production. we take pride in our work and it shows in the end product. >> the california line is mostly locals. the commuters in the morning, i see a lot of the same people. we don't have as tourists. we are coming up to street to chinatown. since 1957, we are the only city in the world that runs cable cars. these cars right here are part of national parks system. in the early 1960's, they became the first roles monument. the way city spread changed with the invention of the cable car. >> people know in san francisco, first thing they think about is, let's go
. this is just really a big, community win and a celebration for us all. >> to learn more about the helen diller playground in dolores park, go to sfrecpark.org. park, go to sfrecpark.org.
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